Sherry Christiansen

About Sherry Christiansen

Sherry Christiansen is a Freelance Medical Writer with an extensive healthcare background, having worked directly with people with Alzheimer’s disease in a home care setting. She also taught about dementia care as part of a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) course. Sherry has experienced first-hand just how important the caregiver is in the daily life, and overall well-being, of those with Alzheimer’s disease. With a diverse writing and editing background, she has helped launch several successful websites and written thousands of articles and blogs, while collaborating on medical research projects at Weill Cornell University’s Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic (APC). Sherry specializes in health and wellness, healthy lifestyle, nutrition and Alzheimer’s prevention. From the home environment to extensive clinical/medical research endeavors to professional writing about the latest in Alzheimer’s disease information, she is an expert in all aspects (including caregiving) and stages of the disease.

Dementia and Halloween: Safety Tips for Loved Ones

Dementia and Halloween: Safety Tips for Loved Ones

As Halloween approaches, caregivers, family members and friends may become concerned about safety for their loved one with dementia. For those with the disease who suffer from confusion, disorientation and other symptoms, Halloween can be a truly frightening holiday. If you are concerned about a parent or senior loved one with dementia becoming lost or […]

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How Memory Care Will Change by 2025

How Memory Care Will Change by 2025

As people continue to live longer lives, the incidence of age-related diseases — like dementia — continues to rise exponentially, along with the need for dementia care and senior living services. Not only are more memory care communities needed, but innovative approaches to providing quality care must also be developed. Read more about these approaches and how memory […]

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Alcohol and Alzheimer’s: New Study Shows Link Between Alcohol and the Disease

Alcohol and Alzheimer’s: New Study Shows Link Between Alcohol and the Disease

There has been some controversy over whether drinking alcohol has detrimental effects on brain health. Some studies indicate that drinking small amounts may be part of a brain-healthy diet, while other studies show that even small amounts of alcohol can increase the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The latest alcohol and Alzheimer’s study reveals that it may interrupt […]

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Does Obesity Prime a Person’s Brain for Alzheimer’s?

Does Obesity Prime a Person’s Brain for Alzheimer’s?

A recent Brock University study in Ontario, Canada, discovered that there may be a direct link to being overweight and developing late-onset Alzheimer’s. The study discovered that the effects of aging, combined with a poor diet and obesity, adversely affected specific brain mechanisms and processes, increasing the risk of the disease. Read on to learn more […]

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How Does Alzheimer’s Spread in the Brain? New Progression Discovered

How Does Alzheimer’s Spread in the Brain? New Progression Discovered

Alzheimer’s is a perplexing disease. Scientists have not been able to find the underlying cause of the condition but are beginning to understand many aspects of Alzheimer’s, such as how the disease may spread in the brain. A recent clinical research study discovered that the “waste-disposal system” in a brain cell may be responsible for spreading harmful […]

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Dementia: Stages, Symptoms and Treatment Options for the Disease

Dementia: Stages, Symptoms and Treatment Options for the Disease

Dementia is not a single disorder, but rather, a spectrum of symptoms of cognitive decline, involving impairment in communication, memory and thinking. The disease involves several stages that each exhibit their own unique indicators and severity of symptoms. Learn more about dementia and its stages, its symptoms and the treatment options for the disease. Dementia Stages Here […]

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